The Long Shadow: The Great War and the Twentieth Century by David Reynolds – review

Here at last among the plethora of predictable books on the anniversary of the great war is an intelligent and critical assessment of what the war has come to mean for Britain over the century that separates us from its outbreak. David Reynolds invites us to consider how and why interpretations of the war have changed through time, and to take stock of the current version of the great war that will sweep across the country in the anniversary year. The book has two main propositions. First, that the impact of the great war in the 20 years that separated it from what became the second world war was much less in Britain than in other parts of Europe; the shadow of the war was kept at bay by the many positive aspects of Britain’s post-1918 history. Second, that the image of the great war was altered by what he calls the “refractions” created by the fact of a second global conflict, the cold war and the later post-communist Europe. During this second phase, he argues, the great war assumed its iconic status as a world of gloomy trenches, antiwar poets and wasted lives, and has, on the whole, stayed that way up to the… Read full this story

The Long Shadow: The Great War and the Twentieth Century by David Reynolds – review have 378 words, post on www.theguardian.com at December 20, 2013. This is cached page on Sách Trẻ. If you want remove this page, please contact us.

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